Saturday, November 22, 2014

Gold Mercury

 Gold Mercury
5 x 7   oil on panel

And still more mercury glass!  

Its more about the challenge of painting reflections than the actual shape of a subject for me. The light is likely what draws me to paint water and boats.  Reflected light and shadow need careful observation and consideration before putting down a single palette knife stroke.  Using a fractured stroke in areas, I drag wet paint across the picture plane, pulling colour from one area into another, creating lost edges and movement.

I probably look more than I paint in fact - like the carpenter's saying "Measure twice, cut once."  Its similar for artists.  The longer you spend observing and taking in visual information on shape, colour and value, the better chance you have for success than if you just slap down paint then try to correct in on the support.  That's when mud and frustration happen.

You can find more of my work on my website Jeanette Jobson Fine Art, my blog, Illustrated Life and on Facebook and Twitter.  Stop by and say hi, I'd love to hear from you!

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Mercury glass


Mercury Glass - SOLD
5 x 7   oil on panel
I inherited a number of mercury glass ornaments that were my parents and their parents before them which were hung on Christmas trees over the years. Its amusing to see manufacturers create replicas of original mercury glass, but as is said, what goes around, comes around.  It seems the world reverts to the classics in many areas.

Mercury glass, also known as silvered glass, contains neither mercury nor silver. It's actually clear glass, mold-blown into double-walled shapes and coated on the inside with a silvering formula.  There is a nostalgia associated with these decorative ornaments and they do have a special appeal that can't be found in ornaments created today.

These ornament sized paintings are a break for me between painting larger pieces in my current boat series, which is on # 11 out of 15 planned pieces.  I am on track, more or less, just need to really focus on painting, which is why this blog is a little sporadic over the last few months.  However, I can see light at the end of the tunnel.   Here's a little peek at what's on the canvas right now.  I can't reveal completed paintings until my solo exhibition opens in the spring, but I can provide little glimpses like this. :)
 

You can find more of my work on my website Jeanette Jobson Fine Art and on Facebook and Twitter.  Stop by and say hi, I'd love to hear from you!

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Remember

French Poppy
5" x 7"  oil on panel

Pte. 2750     Bastow, Albert Chesley    St. John's  Fatality   11/11/17
Pte. 700       Bastow, Frederick Donald  St. John's  Fatality  12/10/16
CQMS  930  Bastow, Gordon Clarence  St. John's  Fatality   11/10/16

Three  brothers had three sons who joined the 1st Newfoundland Regiment and went to the Great War but never returned.  

Gordon Bastow was my great uncle.  Missing in action at the battle in Guadecourte, France. His body was never found.  Age 22

Frederick died of a gunshot wound to the head, buried in Wandsworth Cemetery in England  Age 22

Albert died of disease in Kriegsgefangenenlager, a prisoner of war camp in Germany and was buried at Conde-Sur-L'Escaut Cemetery, northern France. Age 22

Information on these men as well as many others are listed on the Great War database at The Rooms  http://www.therooms.ca/regiment/part3_database.asp 

Last Post  http://www.dva.gov.au/commems_oawg/commemorations/commemorative_events/organise_events/Documents/LastPost.mp3

CQMS 930 Bastow, Gordon Clarence St. John's Fatality 11/10/16
Pte. 700 Bastow, Frederick Donald St. John's Fatality 12/10/16
Pte. 2750 Bastow, Albert Chesley St. John's Fatality 11/11/17

Three brothers had three sons who joined the 1st Newfoundland Regiment and went to the Great War but never returned.

Gordon Bastow, shown above, was my great uncle. Missing in action at the battle in Gueudecourt, France. His body was never found. Age 22

Frederick died of a gunshot wound to the head, buried in Wandsworth Cemetery in England Age 22

Albert died of disease in Kriegsgefangenenlager, a prisoner of war camp in Germany and was buried at Conde-Sur-L'Escaut Cemetery, northern France. Age 22

Information on these men as well as many others are listed on the Great War database at The Rooms http://www.therooms.ca/regiment/part3_database.asp
 
Last Post http://www.dva.gov.au/…/organise_eve…/Documents/LastPost.mp3

Sunday, November 09, 2014

Voices

Wave demo
oil on paper

As I paint, there are voices in my head.  No, not a mental health issue, more an internal guidance system that help me make decisions on the fly.  There is a colour commentary going on as I paint, that goes like this:


"OK, what's the colour/hue that I need to mix?  Is it the right value?  Let's put some on the canvas...ok, that works/darn, that's too bright/dark/light/wrong colour etc.  I want to lighten it with some of the blue.  Add more white, pull some paint from the mix created previously, try it again.  Ok, that works, now leave it alone and go on to the next section."

It sounds crazy when I write it out, but really that's the conversation I'm having with myself when I paint.  Its a series of internal questions, verified by paint strokes on the canvas than pushes me to the point of my original vision for a piece.  Each impending colour, value, or stroke is preceded by a deliberate decision. Whether that decision takes microseconds or hours, its still a decision that is debated internally, and sometimes on canvas.  It is a comparison of what is there to what could be there to determine if there will be harmony or a clash that sends me off the path.

Making Waves
demo oil on paper

Developing this conversation takes time and practice and is essential to provide the series of internal checks and balances that are required to make art that I am happy to put my name to. 

Do others have those internal conversations when painting?  I remember hearing a similar painting thought process from one artist, Rose Frantzen, but not from other artists.  Perhaps its not something one mentions in public for fear of being considered altogether too strange.

Monday, November 03, 2014

Inspiration tantrums

 Plumb Tuckered Out
5" x 7" oil on panel
Available from Etsy - $50 plus shipping

Inspiration is one of those strange things.  There is nothing constant about, no predictability, no reliability either.  It can be as elusive as a needle in a haystack or it floods your head with so many ideas you don't know where to start.

What is inspiration exactly?  The Oxford dictionary definition is:
"The process of being mentally stimulated to do or feel something, especially to do something creative."
When inspiration evades us, it can be coaxed out of hiding by ignoring it completely and just carrying on in any creative vein.  Like a toddler having a tantrum, if ignored, it stops crying and thrashing around and becomes curious about what you're doing.  Curiosity is replaced by the "I want to do that too." phase and before you know it, inspiration takes over your hand and head and is slapping paint on the canvas like never before.

Each time I finish a painting, inspiration drains a little and that's where I pull out the small canvasses like this one and just play.  I can see inspiration poking her head around the corner, sniffling a little but curious too...

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Autumn Pear

 Autumn Pear - SOLD
5" x 7"  oil on panel

Silence doesn't mean I'm not painting.  It means its head down mode and full steam ahead.  I'm trying to make up time in the boat series after deciding that one piece just wasn't working for me, and there was no choice but to restart it.

I think we all know when we don't put our best out there.  Sometimes its easy to let something go just because its the path of least resistance, even if we know something is not right with the painting.  Yes, I could have added the piece but, to me, it would have stuck out like a sore thumb in exhibition and niggled at me constantly.

So now its being redone and coming along nicely.  I've also got #9 on the easel and am pretty much on track again for time - or I hope so.

Of course with the end of one painting, the inevitable "end of palette" small painting was in order.  An autumn pear.  Pears are likely the most over painted subject in the world, some good, some bad and some very bad.  To give them their dues, the shape is simple and value can be complex depending on the lighting.  Its the perfect beginner's fruit to test painting skills with in all mediums.

When I finish all the boats in the series, it might be fun to see if people can match the end of palette painting with the actually painting, based on colours used.

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Insomnia series

 Blue Christmas  - SOLD
5" x 7"
oil on panel


When I can't sleep, there is no point in me staying in bed tossing and turning and fighting with the  thoughts in my head.  I get up after about 10 minutes of trying to sleep and head to the studio.  Doing something, anything is the only way to quiet my mind.

The disadvantage is that painting or drawing takes over and before you know it, the night has gone and sleep hasn't come.  Then I must either go to work or start the day. Sleep usually is not the option that ever wins, at least not until late in the day, as morning primes my spirit and soul.

During my restless nights, I work on large paintings or sometimes tackle little pieces like this one, done around 4am this morning.  I should call these the "Insomnia series".  Where the Christmas theme came from this morning I have no idea.  But it made itself known there in the wee hours.